Category Archives: EasyLanguage Snippets

Updated Pattern Smasher in EasyLanguage

Update To Original Pattern Smasher

What will you learn : string manipulation, for-loops, optimization

Before proceeding I would suggest reading my original post on this subject.    If you believe the relationship of the last few bars of data can help determine future market direction, then this post will be in you wheel house.  Another added benefit is that you will also learn some cool EasyLanguage.

Original post was limited to four day patterns!

This version is limitless (well not really, but pretty close).  Let’s stick with the original string pattern nomenclature (+ + – – : two up closes followed by two down closes.)  Let’s also stick with our binary pattern representation:

Pattern # 2^3 2^2 2^1 1
3 0 0 1 1
4 0 1 0 0
5 0 1 0 1
6 0 1 1 1

Remember a 0 represents a down close and a 1 represents an up close.  We will deviate from the original post by doing away with the array and stick with only strings (which are really just arrays of characters.)  This way we won’t have to worry about array manipulation.

How to create a dynamic length string pattern

This was the difficult part of the programming.  I wanted to be able to optimize 3, 4 and 5 day patterns and I wanted to control this with using just inputs.  I discovered that pattern three is different in a three day pattern than it is in a four day pattern: in a three day pattern it is 011 or – + + and in a four day pattern it is 0011 or – – + +.  Since I am counting 0’s as down closes, pattern #3 depends on the ultimate size of the pattern string.  No worries I will have eventually have another version where I utilize a different value for down closes and we can then have holes in our string patterns.  But I digress – so to differentiate the patterns based on the pattern length I included a maxPatternLen input.  So if maxPatternLen is three and we are trying to match pattern #3 then we will be looking for 011 and not 0011.  That was an easy fix.  But then I wanted to build a string pattern based on this input and the pattern number dynamically.  Here is some psuedo code on how I figured it out.


{Psuedo code to translate pattern number into binary number}
patternNumber = 3
maxPatternLen = 3

numBits = 0    						// stick with binary representation
testValue = 0						// temporary test value
numBits = maxPatternLen-1  			// how many bits will it take to get to the
									// center of - or numBits to represent max
									// number of patterns or 2^numBits
currentBit =numBits					// start wit current bit as total numBits

value1 = patternOptTest				// value1 represents current pattern number
testString = ""  					// build test string from ground up


for icnt = numBits downto 0			//building string from left to right
begin       						// notice keyword downto
	if power(2,currentBit) > value1 then  // must use power function in EL
	begin							// if the very far left bit value > 
		testString = testString + "-"	  // patten number then plug in a "-"
	end
	else
	begin							// else plug in a "+" and deccrement by
		testString = testString + "+"	 // that bits value - if its the 3rd bit
	value1 = value1 - power(2,currentBit)// then decrement by 8
	end;
	currentBit = currentBit - 1		// move onto the next bit to the right
end;
Pseudocode for Binary Representation of Pattern #

Now if you want to optimize then you must make sure your pattern number search space or range can be contained within maxPatternLen.  For example, if you want to test all the different combinations of a four day pattern, then your maxPatternLen would naturally be four and you would optimize the pattern number from 0 to 15.  Don’t use 1-16 as I use zero as the base.  A five day pattern would include the search space from 0 – 31.  The rest of the code was basically hacked from my original post.   Here is the rest of the code to do optimizations on different length pattern strings.  Notice how I use strings, for-loops and comparisons.

input: buyPattern("+++-"),sellPattern("---+"),patternOptimize(True),patternOptTest(7),maxPatternLen(3),patternOptBuySell(1),
	   stopLoss$(2000),profitTarg$(2000),holdDays(5);
vars: buyPatternString(""),sellPatternString(""),buyPatternMatch(""),sellPatternMatch(""),numBits(0),testValue(0),currentBit(0),
      remainder(0),value(0),icnt(0),testString(""),numCharsInBuyPattern(0),numCharsInSellPattern(0);
vars:okToBuy(false),okToSell(false);

buyPatternMatch = buyPattern;
sellPatternMatch = sellPattern;
numCharsInBuyPattern = strLen(buyPatternMatch);
numCharsInSellPattern = strLen(sellPatternMatch);

If patternOptimize then
begin
	numBits = 0;
    testValue = 0;
    value = maxPatternLen;
    numBits = maxPatternLen-1;  
    currentBit =numBits;
    remainder = patternOptTest;
    testString = "";
    for icnt = numBits downto 0
    begin       
        if power(2,currentBit) > value1 then
        begin
            testString = testString + "-";
        end
        else
        begin
            testString = testString + "+";
            remainder = remainder - power(2,currentBit);
        end;
        currentBit = currentBit - 1;
	end;
	numCharsInBuyPattern = maxPatternLen;
	numCharsInSellPattern = maxPatternLen;
	if patternOptBuySell = 1 then
	Begin
		buyPatternMatch = testString;
		sellPatternMatch = "0";
	end;
	If patternOptBuySell = 2 then
	Begin
		buyPatternMatch = "0";
		sellPatternMatch = testString;
	end;
end;
	

buyPatternString = "";
sellPatternString = "";

For icnt = numCharsInBuyPattern-1 downto 0
Begin
	If close[icnt] >= close[icnt+1] then buyPatternString = buyPatternString + "+";
	If close[icnt] < close[icnt+1] then buyPatternString = buyPatternString + "-";
end;
For icnt = numCharsInSellPattern-1 downto 0
Begin
	If close[icnt] >= close[icnt+1] then sellPatternString = sellPatternString + "+";
	If close[icnt] < close[icnt+1] then sellPatternString = sellPatternString + "-";
end;


okToBuy = false;
okToSell = false;

if buyPatternMatch <> "" then
	If buyPatternString = buyPatternMatch then okToBuy = true;
If buyPatternMatch = "" then
	okToBuy = true;
If sellPattern <> "" then
	If sellPatternString = sellPatternMatch then okToSell = true;
If sellPatternMatch = "" then
	okToSell = true;
	
If okToBuy then buy next bar at open;
If okToSell then sellshort next bar at open;

If marketPosition = 1 and barsSinceEntry > holdDays then sell next bar at open;
If marketPosition = -1 and barsSinceEntry > holdDays then buytocover next bar at open;

setStopLoss(stopLoss$);
setProfitTarget(profitTarg$);

If lastBarOnChart then print(d," ",buyPatternMatch);
Final Version of New Pattern Smasher

Also see how I incorporate a profit target and protective stop.  I use the built in BarsSinceEntry function to count the number of days I am in a trade so I can utilize a time based exit.  Here is an interesting equity curve I developed using a two day pattern ( – –) to go long.

Register on the website and I will email you an ELD of the improved Pattern Smasher.  Or just shoot me an email.

 

 

Making Trading Decisions on Current Month’s Profit/Loss

Keeping track of intra-month profit or loss

In real time trading I have noticed that once you reach a certain loss for the month its best, sometimes, to circle the wagons and quit trading until the beginning of the next month.  This concept works best for very short term or day trade algorithms, as its very easy to get started back up.  You can do this with Trend Following, but you must build a logical and replicable process for re-entering existing positions.  Let’s assume a trading algorithm whose averaging losing month is $1500 and you are currently down $2000 – what are the chances that you will revert to the mean or draw down further?  Probably 50/50.  Who knows you might turn around and actually make money by month’s end.  If you review a track record of a hedge fund manager, trader, or algorithm and they show a bar chart of monthly returns and there sticking out like a sore thumb is a big down bar, that kind of makes you think that could happen again.  If you can control the monthly downside without sacrificing the existing Profit:DrawDown ratio, then why not do it.

Sample Code To Monitor IntraMonth $P/L

if month(date) <> month(date[1]) then
Begin
	begMonthProf = netProfit; 
	print(d," ",t," ",begMonthProf);
	canTrade = true;
end;
Capture Beginning Of Month Net Profit

Here I am comparing the month of the current bar against the month of the prior bar.  If they are not equal, then we have a new month.  Store the netProfit in the variable begMonthProf.  All you have to do is compare the current bar’s netProfit to begMonthProf and make a decision.  Here is some code:

Making a Trading Decision Based on Monthly $P/L

		If dayOfMonth(date) > 15 and begMonthProf - netProfit >= intraMonthMaxLoss then canTrade = false;
If Down MaxLoss for Month and Past Mid-Month - Quit Trading

If the day of the month is greater than 15 (month half over) and the difference between the current netProfit and begMonthProfit is greater than a negative intraMonthMaxLoss then quit trading for the month.  Only turn it back on the first bar of the next month.  See how this works for your algos.

Pyramiding and then Scaling Out at Different Price Levels – EasyLanguage

TOTAL, TOTAL, TOTAL – an important keyword

I just learned something new!  I guess I never programmed a strategy that pyramided at different price levels and scaled out at different price levels.

Initially I thought no problem.  But I couldn’t get it to work – I tried everything and then I came across the keyword Total and then I remembered.  If you don’t specify Total in you exit directives then the entire position is liquidated.  Unless you are putting all your positions on at one time – like I did in my last post.   So remember if you are scaling out of a pyramid position use Total in your logic.

vars: maxPosSize(2);

If currentContracts < maxPosSize - 1 and c > average(c,50) and c = lowest(c,3) then buy("L3Close") 1 contract this bar on close;
If currentContracts < maxPosSize and c > average(c,50) and c = lowest(c,4) then buy("L4Close") 1 contract this bar on close;


If currentContracts = 2 and c = highest(c,5) then sell 1 contract total this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 1 and c = highest(c,10) then sell 1 contract total this bar on close;
Scaling Out Of Pyramid

Why you have to use the Total I don’t know.  You specify the number of contracts in the directive and that is sufficient if you aren’t pyramiding.  The pyramiding throws a “monkey wrench” in to the works.

Scaling Out of Position with EasyLanguage

First Put Multiple Contracts On:

If c > average(c,200) and c = lowest(c,3) then buy("5Large") 5 contracts this bar on close;
Using keyword contracts to put on multiple positions

Here you specify the number of contracts prior to the keyword contracts.

Easylanguage requires you to create a separate order for each exit.  Let’s say you want to get out of the 5 positions at different times and possibly prices.  Here’s how you do it:

If currentContracts = 5 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 4 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 3 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 2 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 1 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
One order for each independent exit

The reserved word currentContracts hold the current position size.  Intuitively this should work but it doesn’t.

{If currentContracts > 0 then sell 1 contract this bar on close;}

You also can’t put order directives in loops.  You can scale out using percentages if you like.

Value1 = 5;

If currentContracts = 5 and c > c[1] then sell 0.2 * Value1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 4 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 3 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 2 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
If currentContracts = 1 and c > c[1] then sell 1 contracts this bar on close;
Using a percentage of original order size

 

That’s all there is to scaling out.  Just remember to have an independent exit order for each position you are liquidating.  You could have just two orders:  scale out of 3 and then just 2.

 

Setting Stop Loss and Profit Target Utilizing EntryPrice with EasyLanguage

One Problem with the “Next Bar” Paradigm – market position nor entryPrice are adjusted by the end of the bar

Whenever I develop a strategy I like to program all of my entries and exits without utilizing TradeStations built-in execution functions.  I just got use to doing this when I started programming in Fortran many years ago.  However, there a few scenarios where this isn’t possible.  If you enter a trade and use the following logic to get you out with a loss or a profit when referencing your entryPrice, you will be surprised with your results.  This is because you are telling the computer to use entryPrice before you know what it is.

This logic is absolutely correct in its intention.  However, TradeStation doesn’t realize you are in a position at the end of the bar and can’t properly reference entryPrice.  Okay so we force TradeStation to only issue orders once it has a valid entryPrice.TradeStation only realizes the correct marketPosition the following day and then issues an order for the next bar.  So we get the one bar delay.  It would be helpful if TradeStation would set the marketPosition at the close of the bar on the bar of entry.   However, you can overcome this with TradeStation’s built-in execution functions.  For some reason these functions know exactly when you get in – you can also get the same results by inserting the respective strategies on the chart.

An Easy Fix Though

But this little bug can creep into other areas of your programming.  Keep an eye on this.

Multiple Ouput function in EasyLanguage

In the Pascal programming language you have Procedures and Functions.  Procedures are used when you want to modify multiple variables within a sub-program.  A function is a sub-program that returns a single value after it has been modified by say a formula.  EasyLanguage combines procedures and functions into one sub-program called a function.  Functions and procedures both have a formal parameter definition –  a list that describes the type of parameters that are being received by the calling program.  In Pascal procedures, you pass the address of the value that you want changed.  By modifying the contents of the address you can pass the value back and forth or in and out of the procedure.  In functions you pass by value.   Remember the parameter in a normal function call is used to instruct something within the body of the function and is not altered (e.g. the number 19 in value1 = average(c,19)).  This value doesn’t need to be modified it’s just used.  Look at the following code:

Here I am modifying mav1, mav2 and mav3 within the function and then passing the values back to the calling strategy/indicator/paintbar.  All functions must return a value so I simply assign the value 1 to the function name.  The key here is the keyword numericRef, once I change the values located in the addresses of mav1, mav2 and mav3 (address are provided by the keyword numericRef), they will be made available to the calling program.  This code allows the function to return more than just one value.

A Slightly More Eloquent Approach to Programming Our Pyramiding E-Mini DayTrading Algorithm.

Okay let’s see how I was able to add some eloquence to the brute force approach to this pyramiding algorithm.  The original code included multiple entry directives and a ton of hard coded numerical values.   So let me show you how I was able to refine the logic/code and in doing so make it much more flexible.  We might lose a little bit of the readability, but we can compensate by using extra commentary.

First off, let’s add flexibility by employing input variables.  In this case, we need to inform the algorithm the distance from the open to add additional positions and the max number of entries allowed for the day.

inputs : pyramidDistance(5),maxDailyEntries(3);

Now we need to set somethings up for the first bar of the day.  Comparing the date of today with the date of yesterday is a good way to do this.

if d<>d[1] then 
begin
	canSell = true;
	sellMult = 1;
	sellStop = -999999;
	entries = 0;
end;
First bar of the day housekeeping.

Here is a neat way to keep track of the number of entries as they occur throughout the trading day.  Remember the function EntriesToday(date) will not provide the information we need.

mp = marketPosition * currentShares;

if mp[1] <> mp and mp <> 0 then entries = entries + 1;
How to track the number of entries for today.

If the last bar’s mp[1] is not equal to the current bar’s mp then and mp is not equal to zero then we know we have added on another entry.  Okay now let’s think about eliminating the “brute force” approach.

Instead of placing multiple order entry directives I  only want to use one with a variable stop level.  This stop level will be guided by the variable SellMult.  We start the day with a wacky sell stop level and then calculate it based on the SellMult variable and PyramidDistance input.

if low <= sellStop  then
begin
	sellMult = sellMult + 1;
end;

sellStop = openD(0) - sellMult * pyramidDistance;
Calculate and adapt sell stop level as we go along.

So on the first bar of the day the sellStop = openD(0) – sellMult * pyramidDistance or sellStop = openD(0) – 1 * 5.  Or 5 handles below the open.  Note you an change the pyramidDistance input and make it three to match the previous examples.

if entries = maxDailyEntries then canSell = false;
if time < sess1EndTime and canSell then sellShort 1 contract next bar at sellStop stop;
if mp <=-1 {and barsSinceEntry > 0} then buyToCover next bar at sellStop + 2* pyramidDistance stop;

setexitonclose;
That's it! Pretty simple isn't it?

Ok, we need to tell the computer to turn off the ability to place orders if one of two things happens:  1) we have reached the maxDailyEntries or 2) time >= sess1EndTime.    You could make the time to stop entering trades an input as well.  If neither criteria applies then place an order to sellShort at our sellStop level.   If price goes below our sell stop level then we know we have been filled and the new sellStop level needs to be recalculated.  See how we use a calculation to adapt the stop level with a single order placement directive?  This is where the eloquence comes into play.  QED.

Now you code the opposite side and then see if you can make money  (hypothetically speaking of course) with it.  If you think about it, why does this not work.  And the not so obvious reason is that it trades too much.  Other than trading too much it makes perfect sense – buy or sell by taking a nibbles at the market.  If the market takes off then take a big bite.  The execution costs of the nibbles are just way too great.  So we need to think of a filtering process to determine when it is either better to buy or sell or when to trade at all.  Good Luck with this ES [emini S&P ]day trading algorithm!

inputs : pyramidDistance(5),maxDailyEntries(3);
vars: mp(0),icnt(0),sellStop(0),sellMult(0),canSell(true),entries(0);

if d<>d[1] then 
begin
	canSell = true;
	sellMult = 1;
	sellStop = -999999;
	entries = 0;
end;

mp = marketPosition * currentShares;

if mp[1] <> mp and mp <> 0 then entries = entries + 1;
if mp[1] = -1 and mp[0] = 0 then canSell = false;
if time > 1430 then canSell = false;

if low <= sellStop  then
begin
	sellMult = sellMult + 1;
end;

sellStop = openD(0) - sellMult * pyramidDistance;
if entries = maxDailyEntries then canSell = false;
if time < sess1EndTime and canSell then sellShort 1 contract next bar at sellStop stop;
if mp <=-1 {and barsSinceEntry > 0} then buyToCover next bar at sellStop + 2* pyramidDistance stop;

setexitonclose;
Much More Flexible Code

Learn to Program Pyramiding Algorithm

Would you like to learn how to do this?  Check back over the next few days and I will show you to do it.  Warning:  its not straightforward as it seems – some tricks are involved.  Remember to sign up for email notifications of new posts.

UPDATE[1]:  I have recorded an introductory webcast on how to program this pyramiding scheme.  This webcast is Part 1 and illustrates how to brainstorm and start thinking/programming about a problem.  Part 1 introduces some concepts that show how you can use and adapt some of EasyLanguage built-in reserved words and functions.  I start from the perspective of a somewhat beginning EasyLanguage programmer  – one that knows enough to maybe not get the problem solved, but at least get the ball rolling.  The final code may not look anything like the code I present in Part 1.  However it is sometimes important to go down the wrong trail so that you can learn the limitations of a programming language.  Once you know the limitations, you can go about programming workarounds and fixes.  I hope you enjoy Part 1  I should have Part 2 up soon.  Don’t be too critical, this is really the first webcast I have recorded.  You’ll notice I repeat myself and I refer  to one function input as a subscript.  Check it out:  https://youtu.be/ip-DyyKpOTo

Adding positions at fixed intervals.

Hash Table In EasyLanguage [Part 2]

Using The Hash Table

Now that we have created an empty Hash Table and the Hash Index it is now time to start filling the table up with the appropriate information.  As I pointed out in my last post, every day of any given year can be represented by a nine character string. If January 1st lands on a Tuesday, you can express this day with the following string, “1stTueJan.” That is if you want to ignore the year and in this case, we do.

Mapping Into the Hash Table

The table has already been prepared as well as the index.  All we have to do is map the current day into the index.  The location of the index value in the Hash Index array will then be used to locate the day’s location in the Hash Table.  We will use a function to convert the current day of the year into a value our Hash Index can interpret.

Here is the code to the function.  Don’t fret too much at the number of lines of code!

inputs: testDate(numericSeries);

vars: testMonth(0),tempStr("");
Array : prefixStrArr[6](""),dayofweekStr[5](""),monthName[12]("");
vars: monCnt(0),tueCnt(0),wedCnt(0),thuCnt(0),friCnt(0),tempDate1(0),tempDate2(0);
vars: freshStart(false),occurString(""),dayString(""),monthString("");
vars: whatOccurOfMonthStr(""),cnt(0),td(0),myCnt(0),daysBack(0);

preFixStrArr[1] = "1st";
preFixStrArr[2] = "2nd";
preFixStrArr[3] = "3rd";
preFixStrArr[4] = "4th";
preFixStrArr[5] = "5th";
preFixStrArr[6] = "6th";

dayOfWeekStr[1] = "Mon";
dayOfWeekStr[2] = "Tue";
dayOfWeekStr[3] = "Wed";
dayofWeekStr[4] = "Thu";
dayOfWeekStr[5] = "Fri";

monthName[1] = "Jan";
monthName[2] = "Feb";
monthName[3] = "Mar";
monthName[4] = "Apr";
monthName[5] = "May";
monthName[6] = "Jun";
monthName[7] = "Jul";
monthName[8] = "Aug";
monthName[9] = "Sep";
monthName[10] = "Oct";
monthName[11] = "Nov";
monthName[12] = "Dec";

tempDate1 = month(testDate[0]);
tempDate2 = month(testDate[1]);
cnt = 0;monCnt = 0;tueCnt=0;wedCnt=0;thuCnt=0;friCnt=0;
While (month(date) = month(date[cnt])) and cnt < 30
Begin
//	print(date," ",date[cnt]," ",cnt);
	cnt = cnt + 1;
end;
daysBack = cnt -1;

If daysBack < 0 then daysBack = 0;

For cnt = daysBack downto 0
begin
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 1 then monCnt = monCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 2 then tueCnt = tueCnt + 1;	
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 3 then wedCnt = wedCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 4 then thuCnt = thuCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 5 then friCnt = friCnt + 1;
end;
//print("counts: ",monCnt," ",tueCnt," ",wedCnt," ",thuCnt," ",friCnt);

If dayOfWeek(date) = Monday then tempStr = preFixStrArr[monCnt];
If dayOfWeek(date) = Tuesday then tempStr = preFixStrArr[tueCnt];
If dayOfWeek(date) = Wednesday then tempStr = preFixStrArr[wedCnt];
If dayOfWeek(date) = Thursday then tempStr = preFixStrArr[thuCnt];
If dayOfWeek(date) = Friday then tempStr = preFixStrArr[friCnt];

tempStr = tempStr + dayOfWeekStr[dayOfWeek(date)];
tempStr = tempStr + monthName[month(date)];
GetWhichWeekMonth = tempStr;
GetWhichWeekMonth Function

Here is where using an integer representation of the date would reduce the number of lines of code tremendously.  Well, I made my bed I might as well sleep in it.  You will see some duplication between this code and the Hash Table creator function.  I have to store names for the week rank, day of the week, and month in arrays.  There isn’t a simple function that will pull the week rank from any given date.  So I simply take the date and work my way back to the beginning of the month counting each weekday as I go along.

For cnt = daysBack downto 0
begin
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 1 then monCnt = monCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 2 then tueCnt = tueCnt + 1;	
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 3 then wedCnt = wedCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 4 then thuCnt = thuCnt + 1;
	If dayOfWeek(date[cnt]) = 5 then friCnt = friCnt + 1;
end;

Getting The Hash Index

The number that is stored in the individual counters (monCnt, tueCnt, etc.) determines which week of the month the current day is located.  I build the string through concatenation.  First I get the week rank (“1st”, “2nd”, “3rd”, “4th”, “5th”), add the name of the day and then add the month.  The end result looks like “1stMonJan”.  From here I cross-reference the Hash Index and pull out the location of the of the string (aka index.)  Here is the function GetHashIndex.

input: hashIndex[n](stringArrayRef),hashTableRows(numericSimple),searchString(string);
vars: iCnt(0),done(false);

GetHashIndex = 0;
done = false;

For iCnt = 1 to hashTableRows
Begin
//	print("Looking for: ",searchString," ",hashIndex[iCnt]," ",iCnt);
	If searchString = hashIndex[iCnt] then 
	begin
		done = true;
		GetHashIndex = iCnt;
	end;
	If done then break;
end;
GetHashIndex

As you can see it is a linear search that returns the Hash Index’s Index.  Check out how I prematurely exit the loop by using the keyword Break.  This keyword knocks you out of any loop where it is located.  If you have a nested loop, the break only gets you out of that current loop where it is located.

Hast Table Indicator

Now how can we pull all this together to create a useful trading tool.  I used these tools to create an indicator that plots the average daily change from one day to the next.  So, if today is the “3rdMonJune” and the indicator reads 0.52, this represents that over the last X years the average percentage change is a plus .5%.  Would it make sense to buy the “2ndFriJun” and exit on the close of the “3rdMonJune?”  Maybe.

Here is the code for the Hash Table indicator.

vars: returnValString(""),iCnt(0),jCnt(0); 
array: weekDayMonthIndex[300]("");
array: HashTable[300,100](0);
array: timeLine[300](0);
vars: searchString(""),numYearsCollected(0),hashIndex(0);
vars: yCnt(0),numYears(0);
vars: hashRows(300);
vars: myBarCount(0),maxNumYearsInHash(0),avgDailyChange(0),dailyChangeSum(0);

If barNumber = 1 then  //build the hash index - index form "1stMonJul" "2ndFriDec"
begin
	Value1 = HashIndexCreator(weekDayMonthIndex);
end;

numYearsCollected = HashTableCreator(HashTable,weekDayMonthIndex);  {Build hash table as we go along}

If year(date) <> year(date[1]) then numYears = numYears + 1; 

If numYearsCollected > 3 then  // only pull information if there is at least three years of data
Begin
	searchString = GetWhichWeekMonth(date);	// convert today's date into a compatible Hash Index value
	hashIndex = GetHashIndex(weekDayMonthIndex,hashRows,searchString);  // find the location of today's value in the Hash Index
	dailyChangeSum = 0;;
//	print(d," ",searchString," ",hashIndex);
	For yCnt = 2 to numYearsCollected
	Begin
		dailyChangeSum = dailyChangeSum + HashTable[hashIndex,yCnt];
	end;
	avgDailyChange = dailyChangeSum/numYearsCollected;
	if year(date) = 116 then print(d," ",searchString," ",numYearsCollected," ",avgDailyChange);
	if numYearsCollected > numYears-1  then plot1(avgDailyChange,"AvgChgFromYesterday");
End;
HashTableIndicator

Results of Using the Hash Table

Here is a simple output of the results from the indicator for the year of 2016.  I sorted the data based on highest average daily change and number of years collected.

1160729 5thFriJul 7 0.95
1161031 5thMonOct 5 0.62
1160115 2ndFriJan 16 0.56
1160830 5thTueAug 7 0.55
1160713 2ndWedJul 17 0.52
1160812 2ndFriAug 17 0.52
1160519 3rdThuMay 16 0.43
1161003 1stMonOct 17 0.38
1160112 2ndTueJan 16 0.38
1160223 4thTueFeb 16 0.38
1161122 4thTueNov 16 0.37
1160804 1stThuAug 17 0.35
1160316 3rdWedMar 16 0.35
1160711 1stMonJul 17 0.34
1161121 3rdMonNov 17 0.34
1160225 4thThuFeb 16 0.34
1160517 3rdTueMay 16 0.34
1160610 2ndFriJun 16 0.34
1161215 3rdThuDec 17 0.33

It looks like the buying the close “4thThuJul” is the way to go!  But since there are only seven observations I think would think twice.  But, buying the close on the day prior to “2ndFriJan” might offer that technical advantage you’re looking for.

Hash Table in EasyLanguage [Part 1]

 

This concept may be considered advanced and only used by pure programmers, but that is not the case at all.  A Hash Table is simply a table that is indexed by a function.  The function acts like the post office – it sends the data to the correct slot in the table.  I utilized this data structure because  I wanted to know the closing prices for the past fifteen years for the “1stThuJan” (first Thursday of January.)  This, of course, would require some programming and I could simply store the values in an array.  However, what if I wanted to know the closing prices for the “3rdFriMar?”  I would have to spend more time and re-code, right?   What if I changed my mind again.  Instead, as we programmers often do, I wanted to be able to pull the data for any instance of “Week, Day Of Week, Month.”  This is where a table structure comes in handy.  With this table, I can query it and find out the average yearly closing prices for the “1stMonSep” or the “4thFriJuly” or the “3rdWedApr ” on a rolling year by year basis.  Why would you want this you might ask?  Would it be helpful to know the price  change from the “2ndMonMar” to the subsequent “2ndMonMar” on a rolling basis?  What if the average price change is 10%.  You could use this information to make sure you always buy on this particular day.  That is if you believe in this form of analysis.

Here’s how I created a table that stores the closing prices for the past 15 years for each entry in the table.  Remember each row value only comes up once a year.  You only have one “1stMonJan” in a calendar year.  So the first part of the problem was simple, create a table that can store the closing prices with all the different combinations like the “1stTueJan” for the past fifteen years.  The second part of creating the post office like function that places the correct closing price in the right row was a little more difficult, but not much.  Here’s how I did it.

As I said earlier, a Hash Table is a very simple concept and very useful as well!  For some of you out there, I just want to make sure that you know that I am not talking about a device to keep your cannabis off of the floor;-) All kidding aside, go ahead and take a look at the table below.  Notice how it stores the closing prices of all the possible occurrences of Week, Day Of Week, Month.   Column 1 is the key or Hash Index value.  You will need this key to unlock the data for that particular row.  Column 2 shows the number of years that the data was collected.  Column 3 and on are the closing prices for that particular day across the years.  Once you have the data collected you can do anything your heart desires with it.

Table Index Num. Years Close 1 Close 2 Close 3 Close 4 Close 5 Close 6
1stWedJan 6 603 496 450.25 589 612.75 684.5
1stThuJan 6 606.5 486.25 446 571.75 597.75 683
1stFriJan 6 607.25 491.75 451.5 564.75 597.75 674
1stMonJan 6 606.75 490.75 447 590.25 606.25 679.25
1stTueJan 6 619.25 507 447.25 578.25 612.75 682.5
2ndWedJan 6 617.75 446 412.5 600.75 605.75 688
2ndThuJan 6 615.5 444.75 409.5 612.25 565.75 692.5
2ndFriJan 6 635.5 490.25 400 618.5 553.75 702.5
2ndMonJan 6 652.5 460.25 451 576.75 574.25 717.75

Sounds cool – so let’s do it!

Step 1:  Calculate the size of the table.

Each month consists of 4.25 weeks (52/12).  Because of this, you can have up to five occurrences of any given day of the week inside of a month – five Mondays, Tuesdays, etc.,  So we must build the table big enough to handle five complete weeks for each month.  Since there are 5 days in a week and 5 weeks in a month (not really but plan on it)  and 12 months in a year, the table must contain at least 300 rows ( 5 X 5 X 12.)  Since we don’t know how many years of data that we might want to collect we could make the arrays dynamic, but I want to keep things simple so I will reserve space for 100 years.  Overkill?

Step 2:  Use measurements from Step 1 to construct the container and create an addressing function.

The container is easy just dimension a 2-d array.  A 2-d array is a table whereas a 1-d array is a list.  A spreadsheet is an example of a 2-d array.  Just make the table big enough to hold the data.  Remember the key component to the Hash Table is not what it can hold, but the ability to quickly reference the data.  Just like your home, we need to create a unique address for each of the three hundred rows so the right mail, er data can be delivered or stored.  This is really quite simple –  we know we need a distinctive address and we know we need 300 of them.  Like the table above we can create a unique address in the form of “1stMonJan.”  This is a nine character string.  This  string can easily represent the 300 different addresses.  We start with “1stMonJan” and end with “5thFriDec.”  These values most consist of only nine characters.  I could have done the same thing using an integer value to represent each address.  “1stMonJan” could also be represented with 10101.  The “3rdFriDec” would be 30512.  I liked the string approach because the addresses are instantly recognizable with little or no translation.  So we need to get to typing, right?  Always remember if you are doing something redundant a computer can do the chore and do it quicker.  Just a quick note here.  I  designed the table ahead of time with the values in column 1 already filled in.  I could have done it more dynamically, but creating a data structure and filling in as much information before can save time on the programming side.

Instead of typing each unique address into the table, let’s let the computer do it for us.  Remember, Easylanguage has some cool string manipulation tools and with a little bit of cleverness, you can create the 300 unique addresses in one fell swoop.  The following code creates an array (list) of all of the possible combinations of “Week, Day Of Week, Month.”  There are 100 lines of code here, don’t freak out!  It’s mostly redundant.  I used a Finite State Machine and Easylanguage’s Switch – Case programming structure.  So you are learning about Hash Tables, Hash Indices, Finite State Machines, and Switch-Case programming in one post.  And here, all you want is a winning trading system.  Well, they are hard to come by and you need as many tools at your disposal to unlock the Holy Grail.  This is just one way to come up with the address values.

{Developed and programmed by George Pruitt-copyright 2017 www.georgepruitt.com}
{Just provide credit if you reuse! Or buy my book ;-)}

Input: hashIndex[n](stringArrayRef);
Vars: done(false);
Vars: firstCount(0),secondCount(0),thirdCount(0),fourthCount(0),fifthCount(0);
Vars: state(1),arrCnt(0),tempStr(""),monthCnt(0),returnValString(""),iCnt(0),jCnt(0),numBucket(0);
array: dayString[5](""),monString[12]("");


dayString[1] = "Mon";
dayString[2] = "Tue";
dayString[3] = "Wed";
dayString[4] = "Thu";
dayString[5] = "Fri";

monString[1] = "Jan";
monString[2] = "Feb";
monString[3] = "Mar";
monString[4] = "Apr";
monString[5] = "May";
monString[6] = "Jun";
monString[7] = "Jul";
monString[8] = "Aug";
monString[9] = "Sep";
monString[10] = "Oct";
monString[11] = "Nov";
monString[12] = "Dec";


arrCnt = 0;
monthCnt = 1;
While not(done) and arrCnt<300
begin
	if state < 6 then arrCnt = arrCnt + 1;
	switch (state)
	Begin		   
		case 1:
			firstCount = firstCount + 1;
			tempStr = "1st";
			tempStr = tempStr + dayString[firstCount] + monString[monthCnt];
			hashIndex[arrCnt] = tempStr;
			If firstCount = 5 then 
			begin
				state = 2;
				firstCount = 0;
			end;
		case 2:
			secondCount = secondCount + 1;
			tempStr = "2nd";
			tempStr = tempStr + dayString[secondCount] + monString[monthCnt];
			hashIndex[arrCnt] = tempStr;	
			If secondCount = 5 then 
			begin
				state = 3;
				secondCount = 0;
			end;
		case 3:
			thirdCount = thirdCount + 1;
			tempStr = "3rd";
			tempStr = tempStr + dayString[thirdCount] + monString[monthCnt];
			hashIndex[arrCnt] = tempStr;
			If thirdCount = 5 then 
			begin
				state = 4;
				thirdCount = 0;
			end;
		case 4:
			fourthCount = fourthCount + 1;
			tempStr = "4th";
			tempStr = tempStr + dayString[fourthCount] + monString[monthCnt];
			hashIndex[arrCnt] = tempStr;
			If fourthCount = 5 then 
			begin
				state = 5;
				fourthCount = 0;
			end;
		case 5:
			fifthCount = fifthCount + 1;
			tempStr = "5th";
			tempStr = tempStr + dayString[fifthCount] + monString[monthCnt];
			hashIndex[arrCnt] = tempStr;	
			If fifthCount = 5 then 
			begin
				state = 6;	
				fifthCount = 0;
			end;
		case 6:
			If monthCnt < 12 then
			Begin
				state = 1;
				monthCnt = monthCnt + 1;
			end
			else
			begin
				done = true;
			end;
		end;				
end;
HashIndexCreator = 1;
Hash Index Creator

Here is a brief overview of this code.  The switch statement requires matching case statements.  In this machine, there are 6 different states.  Based on whatever the current state happens to be, the computer executes that block of code.  If the state is 1, then the block of code encapsulated with case(1) is executed.  All other code is ignored.  I start building the array by executing all of the “1st”‘s in January – “1stMonJan, 1stTueJan, 1stWedJan, 1stThuJan, and 1stFriJan.”   The nine character strings are built using concatenation.  In Easylanguage and most other languages you can add strings together:  “Cat” + “Dog” = “CatDog.”  So I take the string “1st” + “Mon” +  “Jan” to form the string “1stMonJan.”  I store the three characters for the day of the week and the three characters for the month in simple arrays.  After the fifth “1st”, I transition to state 2 and start working on all the “2nd”‘s.  Eventually the machine switches into 6th gear, er uh I mean state.  If month count is less than twelve, we gear down all the way back down to state 1 and start the process again for the month of February.  The machine finally turns off after month counter exceeds 12.  The Hash Index is completed; we have a unique address for the 300 rows.  In Part 2 I will show how to map the Hash Index onto the Hash Table and how to store the necessary information.  Finally, we will create an indicator using the data pulled from the table.