Category Archives: EasyLanguage Snippets

Why Do I Need to Test with Intraday Data

Why Can’t I Just Test with Daily Bars and Use Look-Inside Bar?

Good question.  You can’t because it doesn’t work accurately all of the time.   I just default to using 5 minute or less bars whenever I need to.  A large portion of short term, including day trade, systems need to know the intra day market movements to know which orders were filled accurately.  It would be great if you could just flip a switch and convert a daily bar system to an intraday system and Look Inside Bar(LIB) is theoretically that switch.  Here I will prove that switch doesn’t always work.

Daily Bar System

  • Buy next bar at open of the day plus 20% of the 5 day average range
  • SellShort next at open of the day minus 20% of the 5 day average range
  • If long take a profit at one 5 day average range above entryPrice
  • If short take a profit at one 5 day average range below entryPrice
  • If long get out at a loss at 1/2 a 5 day average range below entryPrice
  • If short get out at a loss at 1/2 a 5 day average range above entry price
  • Allow only 1 long and 1 short entry per day
  • Get out at the end of the day

Simple Code for the System

value1 = .2 * average(Range,5);
value2 = value1 * 5;

Buy next bar at open of next bar + value1 stop;
sellShort next bar at open of next bar - value1 stop;

setProfitTarget(value2*bigPointValue);
setStopLoss(value2/2*bigPointValue);
setExitOnClose;
Simplified Daily Bar DayTrade System using ES.D Daily
Daily Bar Using 5 min Look Inside Bar

Looks great with just the one hiccup:  Bot @ 3846.75 and the Shorted @ 3834.75 and then took nearly 30 handles of profit.

Now let’s see what really happened.

What Really Happened – Bot – Shorted – Stopped Out

Intraday Code to Control Entry Time and Number of Longs and Shorts

Not an accurate representation so let’s take this really simple system and apply it to intraday data.  Approaching this from a logical perspective with limited knowledge about TradeStation you might come up with this seemingly valid solution.  Working on the long side first.

//First Attempt


if d <> d[1] then value1 = .2 * average(Range of data2,5);
value2 = value1 * 5;
if t > sess1startTime then buy next bar at opend(0) + value1 stop;
setProfitTarget(value2*bigPointValue);
setStopLoss(value2/2*bigPointValue);
setExitOnClose;
First Simple Attempt

This looks very similar to the daily bar system.  I cheated a little by using

if d <> d[1] then value1 = .2 * average(Range of data2,5);

Here I am only calculating the average once a day instead of on each 5 minute bar.  Makes things quicker.  Also I used

if t > sess1StartTime then buy next bar at openD(0) + value1 stop;

I did that because if you did this:

buy next bar at open of next bar + value1 stop;

You would get this:

Cannot Sneak a Peek with Data2

That should do it for the long side, right?

Didn’t work quite right!

So now we have to monitor when we can place a trade and monitor the number of long and short entries.

How does this look!

Correct Execution!

So here is the code.  You will notice the added complexity.  The important things to know is how to control when an entry is allowed and how to count the number of long and short entries.  I use the built-in keyword/function totalTrades to keep track of entries/exits and marketPosition to keep track of the type of entry.

Take a look at the code and you can see how the daily bar system is somewhat embedded in the code.  But remember you have to take into account that you are stepping through every 5 minute bar and things change from one bar to the next.

vars: buysToday(0),shortsToday(0),curTotTrades(0),mp(0),tradeZoneTime(False);


if d <> d[1] then 
begin
	curTotTrades = totalTrades;
 	value1 = .2 * average(Range of data2,5);
	value2 = value1 * 5;	
	buysToday = 0;
	shortsToday = 0;
	tradeZoneTime = False;
end;

mp = marketPosition;

if totalTrades > curTotTrades then
begin
	if mp <> mp[1] then 
	begin
		if mp[1] = 1 then buysToday = buysToday + 1;
		if mp[1] = -1 then shortsToday = shortsToday + 1;
	end;
	if mp[1] = -1 then print(d," ",t," ",mp," ",mp[1]," ",shortsToday);
	curTotTrades = totalTrades;
end;
if t > sess1StartTime and t < sess1EndTime then tradeZoneTime = True;

if tradeZoneTime and buysToday = 0 and mp <> 1 then 
	buy next bar at opend(0) + value1 stop;
	
if tradeZoneTime and  shortsToday = 0 and mp <> -1 then 
	sellShort next bar at opend(0) - value1 stop;

setProfitTarget(value2*bigPointValue);
setStopLoss(value2/2*bigPointValue);
setExitOnClose;
Proper Code to Replicate the Daily Bar System with Accuracy

Here’s a few trade examples to prove our code works.

Looks Right!

Okay the code worked but did the system?

Uh? NO!

Conclusion

If you need to know what occurred first – a high or a low in a move then you must use intraday data.  If you want to have multiple entries then of course your only alternative is intraday data.   This little bit of code can get you started converting your daily bar systems to intraday data and can be a framework to develop your own day trading/or swing systems.

Can I Prototype A Short Term System with Daily Data?

You can of course use Daily Bars for fast system prototyping.  When the daily bar system was tested with LIB turned on, it came close to the same results as the more accurately programmed intraday system.  So you can prototype to determine if a system has a chance.  Our core concept buyt a break out, short a break out, take profits and losses and have no overnight exposure sounds good theoretically.  And if you only allow 2 entries in opposite directions on a daily bar you can determine if there is something there.

A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Scenario

While playing around with this I did some prototyping of a daily bar system and created this equity curve.  I mistakenly did not allow any losses – only took profits and re-entered long.

Wow! Awesome! Holy Grail Uncovered. Venalicius Cave!

Venalicius Cave!  Don’t take a loser you and will reap the benefits.  The chart says so – so its got to be true – I know right?

The same chart from a different perspective.

You Start and End at the Same Place. But What A Ride. Yikes!

Moral of the Story – always look at your detailed Equity Curve.  This curve is very close to a simple buy and hold strategy.   Maybe a little better.

Daily Bar Ratcheting Stop and Conditional Optimization

Happy New Year!  My First Post of 2021!

In this post I simply wanted to convert the intraday ratcheting stop mechanism that I previously posted into a daily bar mechanism.  Well that got me thinking of how many different values could be used as the amount to ratchet.  I came up with three:

I have had requests for the EasyLanguage in an ELD – so here it is – just click on the link and unZip.

RATCHETINGSTOPWSWITCH

Ratcheting Schemes

  • ATR of N days
  • Fixed $ Amount
  • Percentage of Standard Deviation of 20 Days

So this was going to be a great start to a post, because I was going to incorporate one of my favorite programming constructs : Switch-Case.  After doing the program I thought wouldn’t it be really cool to be able to optimize over each scheme the ratchet and trail multiplier as well as the values that might go into each scheme.

In scheme one I wanted to optimize the N days for the ATR calculation.  In scheme two I wanted to optimize the $ amount and the scheme three the percentage of a 20 day standard deviation.  I could do a stepwise optimization and run three independent optimizations – one for each scheme.  Why not just do one global optimization you might ask?  You could but it would be a waste of computer time and then you would have to sift through the results.  Huh?  Why?  Here is a typical optimization loop:

Scheme Ratchet Mult Trigger Mult Parameter 1
1 : ATR 1 1 ATR (2)
2 : $ Amt 1 1 ATR (2)
3 : % of Dev. Amt 1 1 ATR (2)
1 : ATR 2 1 ATR (2)
2 : $ Amt 2 1 ATR (2)

Notice when we switch schemes the Parameter 1 doesn’t make sense.  When we switch to $ Amt we want to use a $ Value as Parameter 1 and not ATR.  So we could do a bunch of optimizations across non sensical values, but that wouldn’t really make a lot of sense.  Why not do a conditional optimization?  In other words, optimize only across a certain parameter range based on which scheme is currently being used.  I knew there wasn’t an overlay available to use using standard EasyLanguage but I thought maybe OOP,  and there is an optimization API that is quite powerful.  The only problem is that it was very complicated and I don’t know if I could get it to work exactly the way I wanted.

EasyLanguage is almost a full blown programming language.  So should I not be able to distill this conditional optimization down to something that I could do with such a powerful programming language?  And the answer is yes and its not that complicated.  Well at least for me it wasn’t but for beginners probably.  But to become a successful programmer you have to step outside your comfort zones, so I am going to not only explain the Switch/Case construct (I have done this in earlier posts)  but incorporate some array stuff.

When performing conditional optimization there are really just a few things you have to predefine:

  1. Scheme Based Optimization Parameters
  2. Exact Same Number of Iterations for each Scheme [starting point and increment value]
  3. Complete Search Space
  4. Total Number of Iterations
  5. Staying inside the bounds of your Search Space

Here are the optimization range per scheme:

  • Scheme #1 – optimize number of days in ATR calculation – starting at 10 days and incrementing by 2 days
  • Scheme #2 – optimize $ amounts – starting at $250 and incrementing by $100
  • Scheme #3 – optimize percent of 20 Bar standard deviation – starting at 0,25 and incrementing by 0.25

I also wanted to optimize the ratchet and target multiplier.  Here is the base code for the daily bar ratcheting system with three different schemes.  Entries are based on penetration of 20 bar highest/lowest close.

inputs: 
ratchetMult(2),trailMult(2),
volBase(True),volCalcLen(20),
dollarBase(False),dollarAmt(250),
devBase(False),devAmt(0.25);


vars:longMult(0),shortMult(0);
vars:ratchetAmt(0),trailAmt(0);
vars:stb(0),sts(0),mp(0);
vars:lep(0),sep(0);



if volBase then 
begin
	ratchetAmt = avgTrueRange(volCalcLen) * ratchetMult;
	trailAmt = avgTrueRange(volCalcLen) * trailMult;
end;
if dollarBase then 
begin
	ratchetAmt =dollarAmt/bigPointValue * ratchetMult;
	trailAmt = dollarAmt/bigPointValue * trailMult;
end;
if devBase then 
begin
	ratchetAmt = stddev(c,20) * devAmt * ratchetMult;
	trailAmt = stddev(c,20) * devAmt * trailMult;
end;


if c crosses over highest(c[1],20) then buy next bar at open;
if c crosses under lowest(c[1],20) then sellshort next bar at open;

mp = marketPosition;
if mp <> 0 and mp[1] <> mp then
begin
	longMult = 0;
	shortMult = 0;
end;


If mp = 1 then lep = entryPrice;
If mp =-1 then sep = entryPrice;


// Okay initially you want a X point stop and then pull the stop up
// or down once price exceeds a multiple of Y points
// longMult keeps track of the number of Y point multiples of profit
// always key off of lep(LONG ENTRY POINT)
// notice how I used + 1 to determine profit
// and -  1 to determine stop level

If mp = 1 then 
Begin
	If h >= lep + (longMult + 1) * ratchetAmt then	longMult = longMult + 1;
	Sell("LongTrail") next bar at (lep + (longMult - 1) *  trailAmt) stop;
end;

If mp = -1 then 
Begin
	If l <= sep - (shortMult + 1) * ratchetAmt then	shortMult = shortMult + 1;
	buyToCover("ShortTrail") next bar (sep - (shortMult - 1) *  trailAmt) stop;
end;
Daily Bar Ratchet System

This code is fairly simple.  The intriguing inputs are:

  • volBase [True of False] and  volCalcLen [numeric Value]
  • dollarBase [True of False] and  dollarAmt [numeric Value]
  • devBase [True of False] and devAmt [numeric Value]

If volBase is true then you use the parameters that go along with that scheme.  The same goes for the other schemes.  So when you run this you would turn one scheme on at a time and set the parameters accordingly.  if I wanted to use dollarBase(True) then I would set the dollarAmt to a $ value.  The ratcheting mechanism is the same as it was in the prior post so I refer you back to that one for further explanation.

So this was a pretty straightforward strategy.  Let us plan out our optimization search space based on the different ranges for each scheme.  Since each scheme uses a different calculation we can’t simply optimize across all of the different ranges – one is days, and the other two are dollars and percentages.

Enumerate

We know how to make TradeStation loop based on the range of a value.  If you want to optimize from $250 to $1000 in steps of $250, you know this involves [$1000 – $250] / $250 + 1 or 3 + 1 or 4 interations.   Four loops will cover this entire search space.  Let’s examine the search space for each scheme:

  • ATR Scheme: start at 10 bars and end at 40 by steps of 2 or [40-10]/2 + 1 = 16
  • $ Amount Scheme: start at $250 and since we have to have 16 iterations [remember # of iterations have to be the same for each scheme] what can we do to use this information?  Well if we start $250 and step by $100 we cover the search space $250, $350, $450, $550…$1,750.  $250 + 15 x 250.  15 because $250 is iteration 1.
  • Percentage StdDev Scheme:  start at 0.25 and end at 0.25 + 15 x 0.25  = 4

So we enumerate 16 iterations to a different value.  The easiest way to do this is to create a map.  I know this seems to be getting hairy but it really isn’t.  The map will be defined as an array with 16 elements.  The array will be filled with the search space based on which scheme is currently being tested.  Take a look at this code where I show how to define an array of 16 elements and introduce my Switch/Case construct.

array: optVals[16](0);

switch(switchMode)
begin
	case 1:
		startPoint = 10; // vol based
		increment = 2;
	case 2:
		startPoint = 250/bigPointValue; // $ based
		increment = 100/bigPointValue;
	case 3:
		startPoint = 0.25; //standard dev
		increment = 0.25*minMove/priceScale;
	default:
		startPoint = 1;
		increment = 1;
end;

vars: cnt(0),loopCnt(0);
once 
begin
	for cnt = 1 to 16 
	begin
		optVals[cnt] = startPoint + (cnt-1) * increment;
	end;
end
Set Up Complete Search Space for all Three Schemes

This code creates a 16 element array, optVals, and assigns 0 to each element.  SwitchMode goes from 1 to 3.

  • if switchMode is 1: ATR scheme [case: 1] the startPoint is set to 10 and increment is set to 2
  • if switchMode is 2: $ Amt scheme [case: 2] the startPoint is set to $250 and increment is set to $100
  • if switchMode is 3: Percentage of StdDev [case: 3] the startPoint is set to 0.25 and the increment is set to 0.25

Once these two values are set the following 15 values can be spawned by the these two.  A for loop is great for populating our search space.  Notice I wrap this code with ONCE – remember ONCE  is only executed at the very beginning of each iteration or run.

once
begin
   for cnt = 1 to 16
   begin
     optVals[cnt] = startPoint + (cnt-1) * increment;
   end;
end

Based on startPoint and increment the entire search space is filled out.  Now all you have to do is extract this information stored in the array based on the iteration number.

Switch(switchMode) 
Begin
	Case 1:
		ratchetAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops]) * ratchetMult;
		trailAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops]) * trailMult;	
	Case 2:
		ratchetAmt =optVals[optLoops] * ratchetMult;
		trailAmt = optVals[optLoops] * trailMult;
	Case 3: 
		ratchetAmt =stddev(c,20) * optVals[optLoops] * ratchetMult;
		trailAmt = stddev(c,20) * optVals[optLoops] * trailMult;
	Default:
		ratchetAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops]) * ratchetMult;
		trailAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops]) * trailMult;
end;


if c crosses over highest(c[1],20) then buy next bar at open;
if c crosses under lowest(c[1],20) then sellshort next bar at open;

mp = marketPosition;
if mp <> 0 and mp[1] <> mp then
begin
	longMult = 0;
	shortMult = 0;
end;


If mp = 1 then lep = entryPrice;
If mp =-1 then sep = entryPrice;


// Okay initially you want a X point stop and then pull the stop up
// or down once price exceeds a multiple of Y points
// longMult keeps track of the number of Y point multiples of profit
// always key off of lep(LONG ENTRY POINT)
// notice how I used + 1 to determine profit
// and -  1 to determine stop level

If mp = 1 then 
Begin
	If h >= lep + (longMult + 1) * ratchetAmt then longMult = longMult + 1;
	Sell("LongTrail") next bar at (lep + (longMult - 1) *  trailAmt) stop;
end;

If mp = -1 then 
Begin
	If l <= sep - (shortMult + 1) * ratchetAmt then	shortMult = shortMult + 1;
	buyToCover("ShortTrail") next bar (sep - (shortMult - 1) *  trailAmt) stop;
end;
Extract Search Space Values and Rest of Code

Switch(switchMode)
Begin
Case 1:
  ratchetAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops])ratchetMult;
  trailAmt = avgTrueRange(optVals[optLoops]) trailMult;
Case 2:
  ratchetAmt =optVals[optLoops] * ratchetMult;
  trailAmt = optVals[optLoops] * trailMult;
Case 3:
  ratchetAmt =stddev(c,20)optVals[optLoops]
ratchetMult;
  trailAmt = stddev(c,20) * optVals[optLoops] * trailMult;

Notice how the optVals are indexed by optLoops.  So the only variable that is optimized is the optLoops and it spans 1 through 16.  This is the power of enumerations – each number represents a different thing and this is how you can control which variables are optimized in terms of another optimized variable.   Here is my optimization specifications:

Opimization space

And here are the results:

Optimization Results

The best combination was scheme 1 [N-day ATR Calculation] using a 2 Mult Ratchet and 1 Mult Trail Trigger.  The best N-day was optVals[2] for this scheme.  What in the world is this value?  Well you will need to back engineer a little bit here.  The starting point for this scheme was 10 and the increment was 2 so if optVals[1] =10 then optVals[2] = 12 or ATR(12).    You can also print out a map of the search spaces.

vars: cnt(0),loopCnt(0);
once 
begin
	loopCnt = loopCnt + 1;
//	print(switchMode," : ",d," ",startPoint);
//	print("  ",loopCnt:2:0,"  --------------------");
	for cnt = 1 to 16 
	begin
		optVals[cnt] = startPoint + (cnt-1) * increment;
//		print(cnt," ",optVals[cnt]," ",cnt-1);
	end;
end;	
  Scheme 1
  --------------------
   1.00   10.00    0.00 10 days
   2.00   12.00    1.00
   3.00   14.00    2.00
   4.00   16.00    3.00
   5.00   18.00    4.00
   6.00   20.00    5.00
   7.00   22.00    6.00
   8.00   24.00    7.00
   9.00   26.00    8.00
  10.00   28.00    9.00
  11.00   30.00   10.00
  12.00   32.00   11.00
  13.00   34.00   12.00
  14.00   36.00   13.00
  15.00   38.00   14.00
  16.00   40.00   15.00
 
  Scheme2
  --------------------
   1.00    5.00    0.00 $ 250
   2.00    7.00    1.00 $ 350
   3.00    9.00    2.00 $ 400
   4.00   11.00    3.00 $ ---
   5.00   13.00    4.00
   6.00   15.00    5.00
   7.00   17.00    6.00
   8.00   19.00    7.00
   9.00   21.00    8.00
  10.00   23.00    9.00
  11.00   25.00   10.00
  12.00   27.00   11.00
  13.00   29.00   12.00
  14.00   31.00   13.00
  15.00   33.00   14.00
  16.00   35.00   15.00 $1750

  Scheme 3
  --------------------
   1.00    0.25    0.00 25 % stdDev
   2.00    0.50    1.00
   3.00    0.75    2.00
   4.00    1.00    3.00
   5.00    1.25    4.00
   6.00    1.50    5.00
   7.00    1.75    6.00
   8.00    2.00    7.00
   9.00    2.25    8.00
  10.00    2.50    9.00
  11.00    2.75   10.00
  12.00    3.00   11.00
  13.00    3.25   12.00
  14.00    3.50   13.00
  15.00    3.75   14.00
  16.00    4.00   15.00

This was a elaborate post so please email me with questions.  I wanted to demonstrate that we can accomplish very sophisticated things with just the pure and raw EasyLanguage which is a programming language itself.

A Simple Break Out Algorithm Demonstrating Time Optimization

What is Better:  30, 60, or 120 Minute Break-Out on ES.D

Here is a simple tutorial you can use as a foundation to build a potentially profitable day trading system.  Here we wait N minutes after the open and then buy the high of the day or short the low of the day and apply a protective stop and profit objective.  The time increment can be optimized to see what time frame is best to use.  You can also optimize the stop loss and profit objective – this system gets out at the end of the day.  This system can be applied to any .D data stream in TradeStation or Multicharts.

Logic Description

  1. get open time
  2. get close time
  3. get N time increment
    1. 15 – first 15 minute of day
    2. 30 – first 30 minute of day
    3. 60 – first hour of day
  4. get High and Low of day
  5. place stop orders at high and low of day – no entries late in day
  6. calculate buy and short entries – only allow one each*
  7. apply stop loss
  8. apply profit objective
  9. get out at end of day if not exits have occurred

Optimization Results [From 15 to 120 by 5 minutes] on @ES.D 5 Minute Chart – Over Last Two Years

Optimization of Time: Look How the # Trades Decrease as the Time Increment Increases

Simple Orbo EasyLanguage

I threw this together rather quickly in a response to a reader’s question.  Let me know if you see a bug or two.  Remember once you gather your stops you must allow the order to be issued on every subsequent bar of the trading day.  The trading day is defined to be the time between timeIncrement and endTradeMinB4Close.  Notice how I used the EL function calcTime to calculate time using either a +positive or -negative input.  I want to sample the high/low of the day at timeIncrement and want to trade up until endTradeMinB4Close time.  I use the HighD and LowD functions to extract the high and low of the day up to that point.  Since I am using a tight stop relative to today’s volatility you will see more than 1 buy or 1 short occurring.  This happens when entry/exit occurs on the same bar and MP is not updated accordingly.  Somewhere  hidden in this tome of a blog you will see a solution for this.  If you don’t want to search I will repost it tomorrow.


//Optimizing Time to determine a simple break out
//Only works on .D data streams
Inputs: timeIncrement(15),endTradeMinB4Close(-15),stopLoss$(500),profTarg$(1000);

vars: firstBarTime(0),lastBarTime(0),buyStop(0),shortStop(0),
calcStopTime(0),quitTradeTime(0),buysToday(0),shortsToday(0),mp(0);

firstBarTime = sessionStartTime(0,1);
lastBarTime = sessionEndTime(0,1);

calcStopTime = calcTime(firstBarTime,timeIncrement);
quitTradeTime = calcTime(lastBarTime,endTradeMinB4Close);



If time = calcStopTime then 
begin
       buyStop = HighD(0);
       shortStop = LowD(0);
       buysToday = 0;
       shortsToday = 0;
End;

if time >= calcStopTime and time < quitTradeTime then 
begin
	if buysToday = 0 then Buy next bar at buyStop stop;
	if shortsToday = 0 then Sell short next bar at shortStop stop;
end;

mp = marketPosition;

If mp = 1 then buysToday = 1;
If mp = -1 then shortsToday = 1;

SetStopLoss(stopLoss$);
setProfitTarget(profTarg$);
setExitOnClose;
Orbo EasyLanguage Code

 

 

 

Highly Illogical – Best Guess Doesn’t Match Reality

An ES Break-Out System with Unexpected Parameters

I was recently testing the idea of a short term VBO strategy on the ES utilizing very tight stops.  I wanted to see if using a tight ATR stop in concert with the entry day’s low (for buys) would cut down on losses after a break out.  In other words, if the break out doesn’t go as anticipated get out and wait for the next signal.  With the benefit of hindsight in writing this post, I certainly felt like my exit mechanism was what was going to make or break this system.  In turns out that all pre conceived notions should be thrown out when volatility enters the picture.

System Description

  • If 14 ADX < 20 get ready to trade
  • Buy 1 ATR above the midPoint of the past 4 closing prices
  • Place an initial stop at 1 ATR and a Profit Objective of 1 ATR
  • Trail the stop up to the prior day’s low if it is greater than entryPrice – 1 ATR initially, and then trail if a higher low is established
  • Wait 3 bars to Re-Enter after going flat – Reversals allowed

That’s it.  Basically wait for a trendless period and buy on the bulge and then get it out if it doesn’t materialize.  I knew I could improve the system by optimizing the parameters but I felt I was in the ball park.  My hypothesis was that the system would fail because of the tight stops.  I felt the ADX trigger was OK and the BO level would get in on a short burst.  Just from past experience I knew that using the prior day’s price extremes as a stop usually doesn’t fair that well.

Without commission the initial test was a loser: -$1K and -$20K draw down over the past ten years.  I thought I would test my hypothesis by optimizing a majority of the parameters:

  • ADX Len
  • ADX Trigger Value
  • ATR Len
  • ATR BO multiplier
  • ATR Multiplier for Trade Risk
  • ATR Multiplier for Profit Objective
  • Number of bars to trail the stop – used lowest lows for longs

Results

As you can probably figure, I  had to use the Genetic Optimizer to get the job done.  Over a billion different permutations.  In the end here is what the computer pushed out using the best set of parameters.

No Commission or Slippage – Genetic Optimized Parameter Selection

Optimization Report – The Best of the Best

Top Parameters – notice the Wide Stop Initially and the Trailing Stop Look-Back and also the Profit Multiplier – but what really sticks out is the ADX inputs

ADX – Does it Really Matter?

Take a look at the chart – the ADX is mostly in Trigger territory – does it really matter?

A Chart is Worth a 1000 Words

What does this chart tell us?

70% of Profit was made in last 40 trades

Was the parameter selection biased by the heightened level of volatility?  The system has performed on the parameter set very well over the past two or three years.  But should you use this parameter set going into the future – volatility will eventually settle down.

Now using my experience in trading I would have selected a different parameter set.   Here are my biased results going into the initial programming.  I would use a wider stop for sure, but I would have used the generic ADX values.

George’s More Common Sense Parameter Selection – wow big difference

I would have used 14 ADX Len with a 20 trigger and risk 1 to make 3 and use a wider trailing stop.  With trend neutral break out algorithms, it seems you have to be in the game all of the time.  The ADX was supposed to capture zones that predicated break out moves, but the ADX didn’t help out at all.  Wider stops helped but it was the ADX values that really changed the complexion of the system.  Also the number of bars to wait after going flat had a large impact as well.  During low volatility you can be somewhat picky with trades but when volatility increases you gots to be in the game. – no ADX filtering and no delay in re-Entry.  Surprise, surprise!

Alogorithm Code

Here is the code – some neat stuff here if you are just learning EL.  Notice how I anchor some of the indicator based variables by indexing them by barsSinceEntry.  Drop me a note if you see something wrong or want a little further explanation.

Inputs: adxLen(14),adxTrig(25),atrLen(10),atrBOMult(1),atrRiskMult(1),atrProfMult(2),midPtNumBar(3),posMovTrailNumBars(2),reEntryDelay(3);
vars: mp(0),trailLongStop(0),trailShortStop(0),BSE(999),entryBar(0),tradeRisk(0),tradeProf(0);
vars: BBO(0),SBO(0),ATR(0),totTrades(0);

mp = marketPosition;
totTrades = totalTrades;
BSE = barsSinceExit(1);
If totTrades <> totTrades[1] then BSE = 0;
If totalTrades = 0 then BSE = 99;


ATR = avgTrueRange(atrLen);

SBO = midPoint(c,midPtNumBar) - ATR * atrBOMult;
BBO = midPoint(c,midPtNumBar) + ATR * atrBOMult;

tradeRisk = ATR * atrRiskMult;
tradeProf = ATR * atrProfMult;

If mp <> 1 and adx(adxLen) < adxTrig and BSE > reEntryDelay and open of next bar < BBO then buy next bar at BBO stop;
If mp <>-1 and adx(adxLen) < adxTrig AND BSE > reEntryDelay AND open of next bar > SBO then sellshort next bar at SBO stop;

If mp = 1 and mp[1] <> 1 then
Begin
	trailLongStop = entryPrice - tradeRisk;
end;

If mp = -1 and mp[1] <> -1 then
Begin
	trailShortStop = entryPrice + tradeRisk;
end;
	
if mp = 1 then sell("L-init-loss") next bar at entryPrice - tradeRisk[barsSinceEntry] stop;
if mp = -1 then buyToCover("S-init-loss") next bar at entryPrice + tradeRisk[barsSinceEntry] stop;


if mp = 1 then 
begin
	sell("L-ATR-prof") next bar at entryPrice + tradeProf[barsSinceEntry] limit;
	trailLongStop = maxList(trailLongStop,lowest(l,posMovTrailNumBars));
	sell("L-TL-Stop") next bar at trailLongStop stop;
end; 
if mp =-1 then 
begin
	buyToCover("S-ATR-prof") next bar at entryPrice -tradeProf[barsSinceEntry] limit;
	trailShortStop = minList(trailShortStop,highest(h,posMovTrailNumBars));
//	print(d, " Short and trailStop is : ",trailShortStop);
	buyToCover("S-TL-Stop") next bar at trailShortStop stop;
end;

Converting A String Date To A Number – String Manipulation in EasyLanguage

EasyLanguage Includes a Powerful String Manipulation Library

I thought I would share this function.  I needed to convert a date string (not a number per se) like “20010115” or “2001/01/15” or “01/15/2001” or “2001-01-15” into a date that TradeStation would understand.  The function had to be flexible enough to accept the four different formats listed above.

String Functions

Most programming languages have functions that operate strictly on strings and so does EasyLanguage.  The most popular are:

  • Right String (rightStr) – returns N characters from the right side of the string.
  • Left String (leftStr) – returns N character starting from the left side of the string
  • Mid String (midStr) – returns the middle portion of a string starting at a specific place in the string and advance N characters
  • String Length (strLen) – returns the number of characters in the string
  • String To Number (strToNum) – converts the string to a numeric representation.  If the string has a character, this function will return 0
  • In String (inStr) – returns location of a sub string inside a larger string ( a substring can be just one character long)

Unpack the String

If the format is YYYYMMDD format then all you need to do is remove the dashes or slashes (if there are any) and then convert what is left over to a number.   But if the format is MM/DD/YYYY format then we are talking about a different animal.  So how can you determine if the date string is in this format?  First off you need to find out if the month/day/year separator is a slash or a dash.  This is how you do this:

whereIsAslash = inStr(dateString,”/”);
whereIsAdash = inStr(dateString,”-“);

If either is a non zero then you know there is a separator.  The next thing to do is locate the first “dash or slash” (the search character or string).  If it is located within the first four characters of the date string then you know its not a four digit year.  But, lets pretend the format is “12/14/2001” so if the first dash/slash is the 3rd character you can extract the month string by doing this:

firstSrchStrLoc = inStr(dateString,srchStr);
mnStr= leftStr(dateString,firstSrchStrLoc-1);

So if firstSrchStrLoc = 3 then we want to leftStr the date string and extract the first two characters and store them in mnStr.  We then store what’s left of the date string in tempStr by using rightStr:

strLength = strLen(dateString);

tempStr = rightStr(dateString,strLength-firstSrchStrLoc);

Here I pass dateString and the strLength-firstSrchStrLoc – so if the dateString is 10 characters long and the firstSrchStrLoc is 3, then we can create a tempstring by taking [10 -3  = 7 ] characters from right side of the string:

“12/14/2001” becomes “14/2001” – once that is done we can pull the first two characters from the tempStr and store those into the dyStr [day string.]  I do this by searching for the “/” and storing its location in srchStrLoc.  Once I have that location I can use that information and leftStr to get the value I need.   All that is left now is to use the srchStrLoc and the rightStr function.

srchStrLoc = inStr(tempStr,srchStr);
dyStr = leftStr(tempStr,srchStrLoc-1);
yrStr = rightStr(tempStr,strLen(tempStr)-srchStrLoc);

Now convert the strings to numbers and multiply their values accordingly.

DateSTrToYYYMMDD = strToNum(yrStr) X 10000-19000000 + strToNum(mnStr) X 100 + strToNum(dyStr)

To get the date into TS format I have to subtract 19000000 from the year.  Remember TS represents the date in YYYMMDD  format.

Now what do  you do if the date is in the right format but simply includes the dash or slash separators.  All you need to do here is loop through the string and copy all non dash or slash characters to a new string and then convert to a number.  Here is the loop:

        tempStr = "";
        iCnt = 1;
        While iCnt <= strLength
        Begin
            If midStr(dateString,iCnt,1) <> srchStr then
            	tempStr += midStr(dateString,iCnt,1);
            	iCnt+=1;
        end;
        tempDate = strToNum(tempStr);
        DateStrToYYYMMDD = tempDate-19000000;

Here I use midStr to step through each character in the string.  MidStr requires a string and the starting point and how many characters you want returned from the string.  Notice I step through the string with iCnt and only ask for 1 character at a time.  If the character is not a dash or slash I concatenate tempStr with the non dash/slash character.  At the end of the While loop I simply strToNum the string and subtract 19000000.  That’s it!  Remember EasyLanguage is basically a full blown programming language with a unique set of functions that relate directly to trading.

Here is the function and testFunc caller.

STRINGFUNCANDFUNCCALLER

 

Implementing Finite State Machine Functionality with EasyLanguage (Last Trade Was Loser Filter a la Turtle)

Last Trade Was a Loser Filter – To Use or Not To Use

Premise

A major component of the Turtle algorithm was to skip the subsequent 20-day break out if the prior was a winner.  I guess Dennis believed the success/failure of a trade had an impact on the outcome of the subsequent trade.  I have written on how you can implement this in EasyLanguage in prior posts, but I have been getting some questions on implementing FSM in trading and thought this post could kill two birds with one stone: 1) provide a template that can be adapted to any LTL mechanism and 2) provide the code/structure of setting up a FSM using EasyLanguage’s Switch/Case structure.

Turtle Specific LTL Logic

The Turtle LTL logic states that a trade is a loser if a 2N loss occurs after entry.  N is basically an exponential-like moving average of TrueRange.  So if the market moves 2N against a long or short position and stops you out, you have a losing trade.  What makes the Turtle algorithm a little more difficult is that you can also exit on a new 10-day low/high depending on your position.  The 10-day trailing exit does not signify a loss.  Well at least in this post it doesn’t.  I have code that says any loss is a loss, but for this explanation let’s just stick to a 2N loss to determine a trade’s failure.

How To Monitor Trades When Skipping Some Of Them

This is another added layer of complexity.  You have to do your own trade accounting behind the scenes to determine if a losing trade occurs.  Because if you have a winning trade you skip the next trade and if you skip it how do you know if it would have been a winner or a loser.  You have to run a theoretical system in parallel with the actual system code.

Okay let’s start out assuming the last trade was a winner.  So we turn real trading off.  As the bars go by we look for a 20-Day high or low penetration.  Assume a new 20-Day high is put in and a long position is established at the prior 20-Day high.  At this point you calculate a 2N amount and subtract if from the theoretical entry price to obtain the theoretical exit price.  So you have a theoMP (marketPosition) and a theoEX (exit price.)  This task seems pretty simple, so you mov on and start looking for a day that either puts in a new 10-Day low or crosses below your theoEX price.  If a new 10-Day low is put in then you continue on looking for a new entry and a subsequent 2N loss.  If a 2N loss occurs, then you turn trading back on and continue monitoring the trades – turning trading off and then back on when necessary.  In the following code I use these variables:

  • state – 0: looking for an entry or 1: looking for an exit
  • lep – long entry price
  • sep– short entry price
  • seekLong – I am seeking a long position
  • seekShort – I am seeking a short position
  • theoMP – theoretical market position
  • theoEX – theoretical exit price
  • lxp – long exit price
  • sxp – short exit price

Let’s jump into the Switch/Case structure when state = 0:

	Switch(state)
	Begin
		Case 0:
			lep = highest(h[1],20) + minMove/priceScale;
			sep = lowest(l[1],20) - minMove/priceScale;
			If seekLong and h >= lep then 
			begin
				theoMP = 1;
				theoEX = maxList(lep,o) - 2 * atr; 
//				print(d," entered long >> exit at ",theoEX," ",atr);
			end;
			If seekShort and l <= sep then 
			begin
				theoMP = -1;
				theoEX = minList(sep,o) + 2 * atr;
			end;
			If theoMP <> 0 then 
			begin
				state = 1;
				cantExitToday = True;
			end;
State 0 (Finite State Set Up)

The Switch/Case is a must have structure in any programming language.  What really blows my mind is that Python doesn’t have it.  They claim its redundant to an if-then structure and it is but its so much easier to read and implement.  Basically you use the Switch statement and a variable name and based on the value of the variable it will flow to whatever case the variable equates to.  Here we are looking at state 0.  In the CASE: 0  structure the computer calculates the lep and sep values – long and short entry levels.  If you are flat then you are seeking a long or a short position.  If the high or low of the bar penetrates it respective trigger levels then theoMP is set to 1 for long or -1 for short.  TheoEX is then calculated based on the atr value on the day of entry.  If theoMP is set to either a 1 or -1, then we know a trade has just been triggered.  The Finite State Machine then switches gears to State 1.  Since State = 1 the next Case statement is immediately evaluated.  I don’t want to exit on the same bar as I entered (wide bars can enter and exit during volatile times) I use a variable cantExitToday.  This variable delays the Case 1: evaluation by one bar.

State = 1 code:

		Case 1:
			If not(cantExitToday) then
			begin
				lxp = maxList(theoEX,lowest(l[1],10)-minMove/priceScale);
				sxp = minList(theoEX,highest(h[1],10)+minMove/priceScale);	
				If theoMP = 1 and l <= lxp then
				begin
					theoMP = 0;
					seekLong = False;
					if lxp <= theoEX then 
						ltl = True
					Else 
						ltl = False;
				end;
				If theoMP =-1 and h >= sxp then
				begin
					theoMP = 0;
					seekShort = False;
					if sxp >= theoEX then 
						ltl = True
					else 
						ltl = False;
				end;
				If theoMP = 0 then state = 0;
			end;
			cantExitToday = False;	
	end;
State = 1 (Switching Gears)

Once we have a theoretical position, then we only examine the code in the Case 1: module.  On the subsequent bar after entry, the lxp and sxp (long exit and short exit prices) are calculated.  Notice these values use maxList or minList to determine whichever is closer to the current market action – the 2N stop or the lowest/highest low/high for the past 10-daysLxp and sxp are assigned whichever is closer.  Each bar’s high or low is compared to these values.  If theoMP = 1 then the low is compared to lxp.  If the low crosses below lxp, then things are set into motion.  The theoMP is immediately set to  0 and seekLong is turned to False.  If lxp <= a 2N loss then ltl (last trade loser) is set to true.  If not, then ltl is set to False.   If theoMP = 0 then we assume a flat position and switch the FSM back to State 0 and start looking for a new trade.  The ltl variable is then used in the code to allow a real trade to occur.

Strategy Incorporates Our FSM Output

vars:N(0),mp(0),NLossAmt(0);
If barNumber = 1 then n = avgTrueRange(20);
if barNumber > 1 then n = (n*19 + trueRange)/20;

If useLTLFilter then
Begin
	if ltl then buy next bar at highest(h,20) + minMove/priceScale stop;
	if ltl then sellShort next bar at lowest(l,20) -minMove/priceScale stop;
end
Else
Begin
	buy next bar at highest(h,20) + minMove/priceScale stop;
	sellShort next bar at lowest(l,20) -minMove/priceScale stop;
end;

mp = marketPosition;

If mp <> 0 and mp[1] <> mp then NLossAmt = 2 * n;

If mp = 1 then
Begin
	Sell("LL10-LX") next bar at lowest(l,10) - minMove/priceScale stop;
	Sell("2NLS-LX") next bar at entryPrice - NLossAmt stop;
end;
If mp =-1 then
Begin
	buyToCover("HH10-SX") next bar at highest(h,10) + minMove/priceScale stop;
	buyToCover("2NLS-SX") next bar at entryPrice + NLossAmt stop;
end;
Strategy Code Using ltl filter

This code basically replicates what we did in the FSM, but places real orders based on the fact that the Last Trade Was A Loser (ltl.)

Does It Work – Only Trade After a 2N-Loss

Last Trade Loser In Action

Without Filter on the last 10-years in Crude Oil

With Filter on the last 10-years in Crude Oil

I have programmed this into my TradingSimula-18 software and will show a portfolio performance with this filter a little later at www.trendfollowingsystems.com.

I had to do some fancy footwork with some of the code due to the fact you can exit and then re-enter on the same bar.  In the next post on this blog I will so you those machinations .  With this template you should be able to recreate any last trade was a loser mechanism and see if it can help out with your own trading algorithms.  Shoot me an email with any questions.

 

 

 

Ratio Adjusted versus Point Adjusted Contracts in TradeStation Part 2

Thomas Stridsman quote from  his “Trading Systems That Work Book”

The benefits of the RAD contract also become evident when you want to put together a multimarket portfolio…For now we only state that the percentage based calculations do not take into consideration how many contracts you’re trading and, therefore, give each market an equal weighting in the portfolio.

The Stridsman Function I presented in the last post can be used to help normalize a portfolio of different markets.  Here is a two market portfolio (SP – 250price and JY -125Kprice contract sizes) on a PAD contract.

1-Contract SP and JY on PAD data

Here is the performance of the same portfolio on a RAD contract.

Equal rating of SP and JY on RAD data

 

The curve shapes are similar but look at the total profit and the nearly $125K draw down.  I was trying to replicate Thomas’ research so this data is from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1999.  A time period where the price of the SP increased 3 FOLD!  Initially you would start trading 1 JY to 2 SP but by the time it was over you would be trading nearly 3 JY to 1 SP.  Had you traded at this allocation the PAD numbers would be nearly $240K in profit.  Now this change occurred through time so the percentage approach is applied continuously.  Also the RAD data allows for a somewhat “unrealistic” reinvestment or compounding mechanism.  Its unrealistic because you can’t trade a partial futures contract.  But it does give you a glimpse of the potential.  The PAD test does not show reinvestment of profit.  I have code for that if you want to research that a little bit more.  Remember everything is in terms of Dec. 31 1999 dollars.  That is another beauty of the RAD contract.

Another Stridsman Quote

Now, wait a minute, you say, those results are purely hypothetical.  How can I place all the trades in the same market at presumably the same point in time?  Well, you can’t, so that is a good and valid question; but let me ask you, can you place any of these trades for real, no matter, how you do it?  No, of course not.  They all represent foregone opportunities.  Isn’t it better then to at least place them hypothetically in today’s marketplace to get a feel for what might happen today, rather in a ten-year-old market situation to get a feel for how the situation was back then?  I think wall can agree that it is better to know what might happen today, rather than what happened ten years ago.

That is a very good point.  However, convenience and time is import and when developing an algorithm.  And most platforms, including my TS-18, are geared toward PAD data.  However TS-18 can look at the entire portfolio balance and all the market data for each market up to that point in time and can adjust/normalize based on portfolio and data metrics.  However, I will add a percentage module a little later, but I would definitely use the StridsmanFunc that I presented in the last post to validate/verify your algorithm in today’s market place if using TradeStation.

Email me if you want the ELD of the function.

Ratio Adjusted versus Pointed Adjusted Contracts in TradeStation – Part 1

If you play around with TradeStation’s custom futures capabilities you will discover you can create different adjusted continuous contracts.  Take a look at this picture:

Panama vs Ratio Adjusted

Both charts look the same and the trades enter and exit at the same locations in relation to the respective price charts.   However, take a look at the Price Scale on the right and the following pictures.

As you can see from the P/L from each trade list there is a big difference.  The top list is using RAD and the second is the generally accepted Panama Adjusted Data (PAD.)  Ratio adjusted data takes the percentage difference between the expiring contract and the new contract and propagates the value throughout the entire back history.  This is different than the PAD we have all used, where the actual point difference is propagated.  These two forms of adjustment have their own pros and cons but many industry leaders prefer the RAD.  I will go over a little bit of the theory in my next post, but in the mean time I will direct you to Thomas Stridsman’s excellent work on the subject in his book, “Trading Systems That Work – Building and Evaluating Effective Trading Systems”.

Here is another look at draw down metrics between the two formats.

RAD V PAD DrawDown

Who would want to trade a system on 1 contract of crude and have a $174K draw down?  Well you can’t look at it like that.  Back in 2008 crude was trading at $100 X 1000 = $100,000 a contract.  Today May 11th 2020 it is around $25,000.  So a drawdown of $44K back then would be more like $176K in today’s terms.  In my next post I will go over the theory of  RAD, but for right now you just need to basically ignore TradeStation’s built in performance metrics and use this function that I developed in most part by looking at Thomas’ book.

//Name this function StridsmanFunc1

Vars: FName(""), offset(1),TotTr(0), Prof(0), CumProf(1), ETop(1), TopBar(0), Toplnt(0),BotBar(0), Botlnt(0), EBot(1), EDraw(1), TradeStr2( "" );
Arrays: tradesPerArr[1000](0),drawDownArr[1000](0);
Vars: myEntryPrice(0),myEntryDate(0),myMarketPosition(0),myExitDate(0),myExitPrice(0);
If CurrentBar = 1 Then 
Begin
	FName = "C:\Temp\" + LeftStr(GetSymbolName, 3) + ".csv";
	FileDelete(FName);
	TradeStr2 = "E Date" + "," + "Position" + "," + "E Price" + "," + "X Date" +"," + "X Price" + "," + "Profit" + "," + "Cum. prof." + "," + "E-Top" + "," +"E-Bottom" + "," + "Flat time" + "," + "Run up" + "," + "Drawdown" +NewLine;
	FileAppend(FName, TradeStr2);
End;
TotTr = TotalTrades;
If TotTr > TotTr[1] or (lastBarOnChart and marketPosition <> 0) Then 
Begin

	if TotTr > TotTr[1] then
	begin
		if (EntryPrice(1) <> 0) then Prof = 1 + PositionProfit(1)/(EntryPrice(1) * BigPointValue); 
	End
	else
	begin
		Value99 = iff(marketPosition = 1,c - entryPrice, entryPrice - c);
		Prof = 1 + (Value99*bigPointValue) /(Entryprice *BigPointValue);
//		print(d," StridsmanFunc1 ",Value99," ",Prof," ",(Value99*bigPointValue) /(Entryprice *BigPointValue):5:4);
		TotTr = totTr + 1;
	end;
	tradesPerArr[TotTr] = Prof - 1;
	CumProf = CumProf * Prof;
	ETop = MaxList(ETop, CumProf);
	If ETop > ETop[1] Then 
	Begin
		TopBar = CurrentBar;
		EBot = ETop;
	End;
	
	EBot = MinList(EBot, CumProf);
	
	If EBot<EBot[1] Then BotBar = CurrentBar;
	
	Toplnt = CurrentBar - TopBar;
	
	Botlnt = CurrentBar - BotBar;
	
	if ETop <> 0 then EDraw = CumProf / ETop;
	
	drawDownArr[TotTr] = (EDraw - 1);
	
	myEntryDate = EntryDate(1);
	myMarketPosition = MarketPosition(1);
	myEntryPrice = EntryPrice(1);
	myExitDate = ExitDate(1);
	myExitPrice = ExitPrice(1);
	If lastBarOnChart and marketPosition <> 0 then
	Begin
		myEntryDate = EntryDate(0);
		myMarketPosition = MarketPosition(0);
		myEntryPrice = EntryPrice(0);
		myExitDate = d;
		myExitPrice =c;
	end;
	TradeStr2 = NumToStr(myEntryDate, 0) + "," +NumToStr(myMarketPosition, 0) + "," + NumToStr(myEntryPrice, 2) + "," 
	+ NumToStr(myExitDate, 0) + "," + NumToStr(myExitPrice, 2) + ","+ NumToStr((Prof - 1) * 100, 2) + "," + NumToStr((CumProf - 1) *100, 2) + "," 
	+ NumToStr((ETop - 1) * 100, 2) + "," + NumToStr((EBot - 1) * 100, 2) + "," + NumToStr(Toplnt, 0) + "," + NumToStr(Botlnt, 0) + "," + NumToStr((EDraw - 1) * 100, 2) +
	NewLine;
	
	FileAppend(FName, TradeStr2);
End;
vars: tradeStr3(""),
	  ii(0),avgTrade(0),avgTrade$(0),cumProf$(0),trdSum(0),
	  stdDevTrade(0),stdDevTrade$(0),
	  profFactor(0),winTrades(0),lossTrades(0),perWins(0),perLosers(0),
	  largestWin(0),largestWin$(0),largestLoss(0),largestLoss$(0),avgProf(0),avgProf$(0),
      winSum(0),lossSum(0),avgWin(0),avgWin$(0),avgLoss(0),avgLoss$(0),maxDD(0),maxDD$(0),cumProfit(0),cumProfit$(0);
      
If lastBarOnChart then
begin
    stdDevTrade = standardDevArray(tradesPerArr,TotTr,1);
    stdDevTrade$ = stdDevTrade*c*bigPointValue;
    For ii = 1 to TotTr
    Begin
    	trdSum = trdSum + tradesPerArr[ii];	
//    	print(d," ",ii," ",tradesPerArr[ii]);
    	If tradesPerArr[ii] > 0 then 
    	begin
    		winTrades = winTrades + 1;
    		winSum = winSum + tradesPerArr[ii];
    	end;
    	If tradesPerArr[ii] <=0 then 
    	begin
    		lossTrades = lossTrades + 1;
    		lossSum = lossSum + tradesPerArr[ii];
    	end;
    	If tradesPerArr[ii] > largestWin then 
    	begin
    		largestWin = tradesPerArr[ii];
 //   		print("LargestWin Found ",largestWin);
    	end;
    	If tradesPerArr[ii] < largestLoss then largestLoss = tradesPerArr[ii];
    	If drawDownArr[ii] < maxDD then maxDD = drawDownArr[ii];
    end;
 //   print("TradeSum: ",trdSum);
    if TotTr <> 0 then avgTrade = trdSum/TotTr;
	avgTrade$ = avgTrade*c*bigPointValue;
    largestWin = largestWin;
    largestLoss = largestLoss;
    largestWin$ = largestWin*c*bigPointValue;
    largestLoss$ = largestLoss*c*bigPointValue;
    if TotTr <> 0 then perWins = winTrades/TotTr;
    if TotTr <> 0 then perLosers = lossTrades/TotTr;
    If winTrades <> 0 then avgWin = winSum / winTrades;
    avgWin$ = avgWin*c*bigPointValue;
    if lossTrades <> 0 then avgLoss= lossSum / lossTrades;
    avgLoss$ = avgLoss*c*bigPointValue;
    maxDD$ = maxDD *c*bigPointValue;
    if lossTrades <>0 and avgLoss$ <> 0 then profFactor = (winTrades*avgWin$)/(lossTrades*avgLoss$);
    CumProf = cumProf - 1;
    CumProf$ = cumProf*c*bigPointValue;
    
    TradeStr3 = "Total Trades,,"+NumToStr(TotTr,0)+",Num. Winners,"+NumToStr(winTrades,0)+","+NumToStr(perWins,3)+", Num. Losses,"+NumToStr(lossTrades,0)+","+NumToStr(perLosers,3)+NewLine+
                "Profit Factor,,"+NumToStr(profFactor,3)+",Largest Win ,"+NumToStr(largestWin,3)+","+NumToStr(largestWin$,0)+",Largest Loss,"+NumToStr(largestLoss,3)+","+NumToStr(largestLoss$,0)+NewLine+
                "Avg Profit,"+NumToStr(avgTrade,3)+","+NumToSTr(avgTrade$,0)+",Avg Win,"+NumToStr(avgWin,3)+","+NumToStr(avgWin$,0)+",Avg Loss,"+NumToStr(avgLoss,3)+","+NumToStr(avgLoss$,0)+NewLine+
                "Std. Dev,"+NumToStr(stdDevTrade,3)+","+NumToStr(stdDevTrade$,0)+",Cum Profit,"+NumToStr(cumProf,3)+","+NumToStr(cumProf$,3)+",Draw Down,"+numToStr(maxDD,3)+","+numToStr(maxDD$,0)+NewLine;
 	FileAppend(FName, TradeStr3);
 {  Print("Total Trades  ",totalTrades," Num. Winners ",winTrades," ",perWins," Num. Losses    ",lossTrades," ",perLosers);
    Print("Profit Factor ",profFactor," Largest Win   ",largestWin:5:2," ",largestWin$," Largest Loss ",largestLoss:5:2," ",largestLoss$);
    Print("Avg Profit ",avgTrade," ",avgTrade$," Avg Win ",avgWin," ",avgWin$," Avg Loss ",avgLoss," ",avgLoss$);
    Print("St Dev ",stdDevTrade," ",stdDevTrade$," Cum Profit ",cumProf," ",cumProf$," Drawdown ",maxDD," ",maxDD$);}
    
    
 end;   
    
    

StridsmanFunc1 = 1;
Conversion of Performance Metrics to Percentages Instead of $Dollars

This function will out put a file that looks like this.  Go ahead and play with the code – all you have to do is call the function from within an existing strategy that you are working with.  In part two I will go over the code and explain what its doing and how arrays and strings were used to archive the trade history and print out this nifty table.

Stridsman Function Output.

In this output if you treat the return from each trade as a function of the entry price and accumulate the returns you can convert the value to today’s current market price of the underlying.  In this case a 15 -year test going through the end of last year, ended up making almost $70K.

RAD TradeStation Metrics:

Profit $350K – Draw Down $140K

PAD TradeStation Metrics:

Profit $89K – Draw Down $45K

Stridsman Func on RAD:

Profit $70K – Draw Down $48K

At this point you can definitely determine that the typical RAD/TS metrics are not all that usuable.  The PAD/TS results look very similar to RAD/StridsmanFunc results.  Stay tuned for my next post and I will hopefully explain why RAD/StridsmanFunc is probably the most accurate performance metrics of the three.

Testing Keith Fitschen’s Bar Scoring with Pattern Smasher

Keith’s Book

Thanks to MJ for planting the seed for this post.  If you were one of the lucky ones to get Keith’s “Building Reliable Trading SystemsTradable Strategies that Perform as They Backtest and Meet Your Risk-Reward Goals”  book by John Wiley 2013 at the list price of $75 count yourself lucky.  The book sells for a multiple of that on Amazon.com.  Is there anything earth shattering in the book you might ask?  I wouldn’t necessarily say that, but there are some very well thought out and researched topics that most traders would find of interest.

Bar Scoring

In his book Keith discusses the concept of bar-scoring.  In Keith’s words, “Bar-scoring is an objective way to classify an instrument’s movement potential every bar.  The two parts of the bar-scoring are the criterion and the resultant profit X days hence.”  Keith provides several bar scoring techniques, but I highlight just one.

Keith broke these patterns down into the relationship of the close to the open, and close in the upper half of the range; close greater than the open and close in the lower half of the range.  He extended the total number of types to 8 by adding the relationship of the close of the bar to yesterdays bar.

The PatternSmasher code can run through a binary representation

for each pattern and test holding the position for an optimizable number of days.  It can also check for long and short positions.  The original Pattern Smasher code used a for-loop to create patterns that were then compared to the real life facsimile.  In this code it was easier to just manually define the patterns and assign them the binary string.

if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "----";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "---+";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "--+-";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "--++";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+--";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+-+";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-++-";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+++";
Manual Pattern Designations

Please check my code for any errors.  Here I go through the 8 different relationships and assign them to a Patter String.  “-+++”  represents pattern number (7 ) or type (7 + 1 = 8 – my strings start out at 0).  You can then optimize the test pattern and if the test pattern matches the actual pattern, then the Pattern Smasher takes the trade  on the opening of the next bar and holds it for the number of days you specify.  You an also designate long and short positions in the code.  Here I optimized the 8 patterns going long and short and holding from 1-4 days.

Here is the equity curve!  Remember these are Hypothetical Results with $0 commission/slippage and historic performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.  Educational purposes only!  This is tested on ES.D

Play around with the code and let me know if you find any errors or any improvements.

input: patternTests(8),orbAmount(0.20),LorS(1),holdDays(0),atrAvgLen(10),enterNextBarAtOpen(true);
  
var: patternTest(""),patternString(""),tempString("");
var: iCnt(0),jCnt(0);
array: patternBitChanger[4](0);
   
{written by George Pruitt -- copyright 2019 by George Pruitt
 This will test a 4 day pattern based on the open to close
 relationship.  A plus represents a close greater than its
 open, whereas a minus represents a close less than its open.
 The default pattern is set to pattern 14 +++- (1110 binary).
 You can optimize the different patterns by optimizing the
 patternTests input from 1 to 16 and the orbAmount from .01 to
 whatever you like.  Same goes for the hold days, but in this
 case you optimize start at zero.  The LorS input can be
 optimized from 1 to 2 with 1 being buy and 2 being sellshort.}
  
patternString = "";
patternTest = "";
 
patternBitChanger[0] = 0;
patternBitChanger[1] = 0;
patternBitChanger[2] = 0;
patternBitChanger[3] = 0;
 
value1 = patternTests - 1;
 
 
//example patternTests = 0 -- > 0000
//example patternTests = 1 -- > 0001
//example patternTests = 2 -- > 0010
//example patternTests = 3 -- > 0011
//example patternTests = 4 -- > 0100
//example patternTests = 5 -- > 0101
//example patternTests = 6 -- > 0110
//example patternTests = 7 -- > 0111

if(value1 >= 0) then
begin
 
    if(mod(value1,2) = 1) or value1 = 1 then patternBitChanger[0] = 1;
    value2 = value1 - patternBitChanger[0] * 1;
  
    if(value2 >= 7) then begin
        patternBitChanger[3] = 1;
        value2 = value2 - 8;
    end;
 
    if(value2 >= 4) then begin
        patternBitChanger[2] = 1;
        value2 = value2 - 4;
    end;
    if(value2 = 2) then patternBitChanger[1] = 1;
end;

for iCnt = 3 downto 0  begin
    if(patternBitChanger[iCnt] = 1) then
    begin
        patternTest = patternTest + "+";
    end
    else
    begin
        patternTest = patternTest + "-";    
    end;
end;
 
 patternString = "";
  
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "----";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "---+";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "--+-";
if c[0]> c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "--++";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+--";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] > o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+-+";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] > (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-++-";
if c[0]< c[1] and c[0] < o[0] and c[0] < (h[0] + l[0])/2  then patternString = "-+++";

 
if(barNumber = 1) then print(elDateToString(date)," pattern ",patternTest," ",patternTests-1);
if(patternString = patternTest) then
 begin
 
//   print(date," ",patternString," ",patternTest); //uncomment this and you can print out the pattern
	if (enterNextBarAtOpen) then
	begin
		if(LorS = 2) then SellShort("PatternSell") next bar on open;
		if(LorS = 1) then buy("PatternBuy") next bar at open;
	end
	else
	begin
		if(LorS = 2) then SellShort("PatternSellBO") next bar at open of tomorrow - avgTrueRange(atrAvgLen) * orbAmount stop;
    	if(LorS = 1) then buy("PatternBuyBO") next bar at open of tomorrow + avgTrueRange(atrAvgLen) * orbAmount stop;
    end;
	

end;
 
if(holdDays = 0 ) then setExitonClose;
if(holdDays > 0) then
begin
    if(barsSinceEntry = holdDays and LorS = 2) then BuyToCover("xbarLExit") next bar at open;
    if(barsSinceEntry = holdDays and LorS = 1) then Sell("xbarSExit") next bar at open;
end;
Bar Scoring Testing Template

MULTI-TIME FRAME – KEEPING TRACK OF DISCRETE TIME FRAMES

Just a quick post here.  I was asked how to keep track of the opening price for each time frame from our original Multi-Time Frame indicator and I was answering the question when I thought about modifying the indicator.  This version keeps track of each discrete time frame.  The original simply looked back a multiple of the base chart to gather the highest highs and lowest lows and then would do a simple calculation to determine the trend.  So let’s say its 1430 on a five-minute bar and you are looking back at time frame 2.  All I did was get the highest high and lowest low two bars back and stored that information as the high and low of time frame 2.  Time frame 3 simply looked back three bars to gather that information.  However if you tried to compare these values to a 10-minute or 15-minute chart they would not match.

In this version, I use the modulus function to determine the demarcation of each time frame.  If I hit the border of the time frame I reset the open, high, low and carry that value over until I hit the next demarcation.  All the while collecting the highest highs and lowest lows.  In this model, I am working my way from left to right instead of right to left.  And in doing so each time frame is discrete.

Let me know which version you like best.

 

Inputs:tf1Mult(2),tf2Mult(3),tf3Mult(4),tf4Mult(5);



vars: mtf1h(0),mtf1l(0),mtf1o(0),mtf1c(0),mtf1pvt(0),diff1(0),
      mtf2h(0),mtf2l(0),mtf2o(0),mtf2c(0),mtf2pvt(0),diff2(0),
      mtf3h(0),mtf3l(0),mtf3o(0),mtf3c(0),mtf3pvt(0),diff3(0),
      mtf4h(0),mtf4l(0),mtf4o(0),mtf4c(0),mtf4pvt(0),diff4(0),
      mtf0pvt(0),diff0(0);

If barNumber = 1 then
Begin
	mtf1o = o;
	mtf2o = o;
	mtf3o = o;
	mtf4o = o;
end;


If barNumber > 1 then
Begin

	Condition1 =  mod((barNumber+1),tf1Mult) = 0;
	Condition2 =  mod((barNumber+1),tf2Mult) = 0;
	Condition3 =  mod((barNumber+1),tf3Mult) = 0;
	Condition4 =  mod((barNumber+1),tf4Mult) = 0;
	
	mtf1h = iff(not(condition1[1]),maxList(high,mtf1h[1]),high);
	mtf1l = iff(not(condition1[1]),minList(low,mtf1l[1]),low);
	mtf1o = iff(condition1[1],open,mtf1o[1]);
	mtf1c = close;

	
	mtf0pvt = (close + high + low) / 3;
	diff0 = close - mtf0pvt;
	
	mtf2h = iff(not(condition2[1]),maxList(high,mtf2h[1]),high);
	mtf2l = iff(not(condition2[1]),minList(low,mtf2l[1]),low);
	mtf2o = iff(condition2[1],open,mtf2o[1]);
	mtf2c = close;
	
	
	mtf1pvt = (mtf1h+mtf1l+mtf1c) / 3;
	diff1 = mtf1c - mtf1pvt;
		
	mtf2pvt = (mtf2h+mtf2l+mtf2c) / 3;
	diff2 = mtf2c - mtf2pvt;
		
	mtf3h = iff(not(condition3[1]),maxList(high,mtf3h[1]),high);
	mtf3l = iff(not(condition3[1]),minList(low,mtf3l[1]),low);
	mtf3o = iff(condition3[1],open,mtf3o[1]);
	mtf3c = close;
	
	mtf3pvt = (mtf3h+mtf3l+mtf3c) / 3;
	diff3 = mtf3c - mtf3pvt;
	
	mtf4h = iff(not(condition4[1]),maxList(high,mtf4h[1]),high);
	mtf4l = iff(not(condition4[1]),minList(low,mtf4l[1]),low);
	mtf4o = iff(condition4[1],open,mtf4o[1]);
	mtf4c = close;

	mtf4pvt = (mtf4h+mtf4l+mtf4c) / 3;
	diff4 = mtf4c - mtf4pvt;
	
	
	Condition10 = diff0 > 0;
	Condition11 = diff1 > 0;
	Condition12 = diff2 > 0;
	Condition13 = diff3 > 0;
	Condition14 = diff4 > 0;
	 
	If condition10 then setPlotColor(1,Green) else SetPlotColor(1,Red);
	If condition11 then setPlotColor(2,Green) else SetPlotColor(2,Red);
	If condition12 then setPlotColor(3,Green) else SetPlotColor(3,Red);
	If condition13 then setPlotColor(4,Green) else SetPlotColor(4,Red);
	If condition14 then setPlotColor(5,Green) else SetPlotColor(5,Red);
	
	condition6 = condition10 and condition11 and condition12 and condition13 and condition14;
	Condition7 = not(condition10) and not(condition11) and not(condition12) and not(condition13) and not(condition14);

	If condition6 then setPlotColor(7,Green);
	If condition7 then setPlotColor(7,Red);
	
	If condition6 or condition7 then plot7(7,"trend");

	Plot6(5,"line");	
	Plot1(4,"t1");
	Plot2(3,"t2");
	Plot3(2,"t3");
	Plot4(1,"t4");
	Plot5(0,"t5"); 

end;
Multi-Time Frame with Discrete Time Frames